Contact Us
936 291 0210
Hours
Mon - Fri: 7:30am to 5pm

Help

Click on a topic to expand the list of FAQs:

General Computer Repair (1)

The cost to repair a computer depends on how long it takes and what parts are needed. Unfortunately, no one knows exactly what is causing the problem with their computer, how long it will take, or what parts are going to cost when they bring their machines into our office (or have us come on-site). This, unfortunately, prohibits us from giving you a quote for repairs until we have examined your computer.

Comment on this FAQ

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Windows 10 (4)

Microsoft says that just about any Intel processor above 1ghz can be upgraded to Windows 10, and almost the same for AMD processors. That is like saying you can get from New York to Seattle, by walking. While technically true, is that what you want to do?

We recommend that you have at least a 3rd generation Intel Core i3, 8GB of RAM, and an SSD or better before you consider upgrading to Windows 10. That means that many computers manufactured since 2013 are potentially upgradeable.

So how do you find out? In Windows 7, click on the start menu at the bottom left of your screen, then RIGHT click on Computer up and to the right. Finally, select Properties and you should see a screen similar to the following.

 

 

Inside the red box, you should see a four-digit number, in this case, it is 3220. The first of those four digits is the generation of the processor, in this case, 3rd generation. We want that to be at least a 4.

Below is the amount of RAM and we would like that to be 8GB although we can usually upgrade the memory to get it to that level.

Lastly, below the memory, it will say either 32-bit or 64-bit and we want 64-bit. If you are running a 32-bit operating system the work required to get it to a 64-bit operating system so it can use 8GB of memory is too significant to be worth the trouble. The same guidelines apply to a Windows 8 computer.

 

Category: Windows 10

Comment on this FAQ

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Technically, yes. We bill by the hour when on-site so if we are waiting on your computer to install the update, or waiting on it to download, you are being billed. Let me be very clear if a technician is on-site for four hours, working on your computer for maybe thirty minutes and waiting while staring at the wall or their phone for the other three and a half hours, you will be billed for four full hours. This is why we highly suggest you bring your computer in to have it upgraded.

Category: Windows 10

Comment on this FAQ

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

If you are new to Windows 10 you may have a lot of questions about where things have been moved to, and how to complete tasks you used to do on Windows 7 which are now different.

You can use online guides and YouTube videos but my personal favorite way to pick up this information is the bright yellow For Dummies books, and in this case:

All the For Dummies books are excellent and this one is no exception. It also helps when I have a question that I remember the answer was in the book that I can just reach over and grab the book off the shelf to find the answer.

Category: Windows 10

Comment on this FAQ

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

The free upgrade to Windows 10 technically stopped over two years ago. We have been able to still perform the upgrade using a specific method still left open by Microsoft. Microsoft could, at any time, close this method of upgrading with no notice. No one knows when, or if, they will close this method. The only way to know is to try it, it will either work or not.

Category: Windows 10

Comment on this FAQ

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Load More